Omicron Oracle articles

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The 1960s: Defying the Era’s Stereotypes

Omicron Oracle

The 1960s? You know the images: peace and freedom marches, love beads, draft-card burnings, marijuana and LSD, and campus protests.

Not, however, at Omicron. These clichés may have applied elsewhere during that turbulent decade, but for the most part, our fraternity— like many others at Cornell— was not a hotbed of unrest during the 1960s.

Henry McNulty ’69

David Shannon ’69

Editor’s note: In 1999, our chapter house at 125 Edgemoor Lane will be 100 years old; we have occupied the building since 1920. To help celebrate the anniversary, The Omicron Oracle is asking certain alumni to recall life at 125 Edgemoor Lane over the various decades that it has housed our fraternity. This issue’s article is by Henry McNulty and David Shannon, both ’69.

The 1940s: The War Temporarily Closes Omicron Zeta

Omicron Oracle

World War II at first meant the virtual disappearance of male students from college campuses. But the military soon realized that the effort to train great numbers of officers was being hampered by the educational level of the officer candidates. At the same time, many universities were hard pressed to survive financially with the loss of half their students.

Robert F. McKinless '48

Editor’s note: In 1999, our chapter house at 125 Edgemoor Lane will be 100 years old; we have occupied the house since 1920. To help celebrate the anniversary, The Omicron Oracle is asking certain alumni to recall life at 125 Edgemoor Lane over the various decades that it has housed our fratenrity. This article is by Robert F. McKinless ’48 and appeared in the August 1997 issue of the Oracle.

Claude E. Mitchell ’10 O-1

Omicron Oracle

When Claude Ellsworth Mitchell, or Mitch, as we called him then, first got off the train in Etna, he had all of five dollars on his person. As was the custom, I met Mitch at the train and brought him to the apartment where I was staying with Dick Kiliani and George W. Griffith. That was in the spring of 1908.

Ernst J. C. Fischer

This brief biography of Brother Mitchell was written by Ernst J.C. Fischer ’10 O-34 for the February 1969 Omicron Oracle.

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